Tags

, , , , , ,

Thanks to development of new technologies, both in hardware and software design, the interaction between humans and machines is tightening more and more on a daily scale. One of the most noticeable goal of this connection is to assist people in everyday life in order to improve their performances in term of research and knowledge. The 3D visualisation field is profusely contained in this evolving process since it attempts to reproduce the way human beings perceive the world.
In addition it helps to store and visualize data and information in a completely different way in respect of the traditional databases which in general contain text files.

In particular 3D visualisation aims at reproducing the real world, gathering information from pictures and other files, and at the same time storing data regarding the objects that have been represented.
The design of 3D visualisation tools is grouping several research projects since it requires highly advanced computer programming skills and graphic knowledge.

The first paper that has been analyzed aims at improving earlier platforms which have already implemented the real-time display of annotated 3D models [1]. This article presents the development of the new Scholarly 3D Toolkit (S3DT) designed to provide better 3D historical reconstructions. In particular S3DT overcomes problems such as spaces and objects changing over time.
As stated in the article, “the result of this work will allow users to view multiple layers of data plotted within a single online 3D environment, showing markers for events, personal connections, document, images, and annotations from multiple users, all in time and space”. This toolkit has been conceived in two main stages: the first one has been issued to add metadata and information regarding the objects that will be in the 3D environment, the second one is a “web template” that allows to check and eventually modify as well as add data to the published exhibitions.

Within the framework of 3D visualization technology is also contained another branch of software that targets the implementation of the so called “procedural modeling” of 3D environment. Regarding this different type of approach is noteworthy to mention a paper that applied procedural modeling to reproduce historical locations and buildings [2]. As a procedural modeling method, it defines rules that have to be applied to computer programming language and subsequently creates a 3D model of the building involved. To be more specific it does not use polygons to create the building as other software such as SketchUp but it creates the polygonal model upon which the edifice will be built. The rules that have been designed in this work can be applied to structures such as classical temple and archs since they are modular and easily adaptable to different topologies.
The world of 3D modeling could aid people to reproduce real environment but, in particular, digital humanities researches since it offers the possibility to recreate scenes and buildings from the past and so represent information from a different point of view.

Although the design of new technologies such as the two presented above is the starting point to achieve this goal, the ability to create and store information regarding 3D scenes is fundamental as well.
As stated in [3], several ways of grouping and spreading information already exist but they still focus on fulfilling the requirements specified by a museum for example. The ontology presented in [3] aims at being a more general method that could help to define 3D objects, report information about them, link different 3D representation and make the visualization “human- and machine- searchable”. The principal objective is to create a network that can link different 3D visualisation and conceive a virtual environment in which scholars could effortlessly collaborate.
To summarize, all the articles cited in this post are concerned with 3D visualisation technologies. However, [1] and [2] explain different methods of creating models and 3D reproduced environment, while [3] is fully involved not in the graphical representation of these models but in the data storage of all the items such as objects and buildings contained in the environment itself.
Each one of the two formers papers presents pros and cons. On one hand the first implements improvement in software that can easily create 3D scenes, even taking into account time, but is less reproducible. On the other hand the second one shows a procedural algorithm that is largely more time consuming but at the same time could create models that are adaptable to different circumstances.

References:

[1]: THE SCHOLARLY 3D TOOLKIT: ANNOTATION, PUBLICATION, AND ANALYSIS OF 3D SCENES ALONGSIDE IMPORTED HUMANITIES DATA, 2014-07-11, James Joel.

[2]: AN INTEGRATED APPROACH TO THE PROCEDURAL MODELING OF ANCIENT CITIES AND BUILDINGS, 2014-07-09, Saldana Marie.

[3]: AN ONTOLOGY FOR 3D VISUALISATION OF CULTURAL HERITAGE, 2014-07-10, Vitale Valeria.

Advertisements